We have made a selection of the questions that are most frequently asked. We hope to answer most of your questions below. Enjoy reading!

  1. How often do I water my plant and where do I put it?
  2. My plantís leaves are drooping while the soil is still moist. How is this possible?
  3. My Bonsai or Ficus is dropping its leaves. How do I prevent it from doing this?
  4. Can plants do damage to human or animal health?
  5. How large will my Take-a-way plant grow?
  6. How can I prevent my plants from falling ill?
  7. What can I do when my plant has aphids?
  8. What can I do when my plant has red spider mite?
  9. What can I do when my plant has scale insects or mealybugs?


1. How often do I water my plant and where do I put it?

That depends on the species of the plant. Look under the heading ‘plants’ and click on the Take-a-way plant you have either bought or got as a present. Or you can look under ‘plant care’ and scroll down for your nephrolepis or spiralis. Under the heading ‘caring for a bamboo’ you will find all the information you need to make sure your bamboo has a lovely life.

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2. My plantís leaves are drooping while the soil is still moist. How is this possible?

What could be the matter when you find that your plant’s leaves start to droop or turn yellow while you believe the clod to always have been sufficiently moist or wet? It could be that you are somewhat overenthusiastic in taking care of your plants. When you water them too much or irregularly, they will drown. Roots are in need not only of water, but of oxygen as well. When you pour too much water in your plant pots, there will not be enough air in the soil in order to provide the roots sufficiently with oxygen. This way the roots will stop absorbing the water and the leaves will turn yellow or start to droop. Or it could be that the roots have started to rot. Check for water at the bottom of the pot, and dispose of it. Do not water the plant until you find the soil has dried out a little. You might be lucky and your plant might recover. Sometimes when there is too much harm done, they won’t flourish anew. In that case it might be time for a new plant.

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3. My Bonsai or Ficus is dropping its leaves. How do I prevent it from doing this?

Check our Bonsai pages. There you will find specific information on how to take care of a Bonsai tree or plant. Bonsai is extremely sensitive. It needs your special attention.

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4. Can plants do damage to human or animal health?

No. Plants are healthy and benevolent to human beings and to animals. Click on the heading ‘Health’ for all kinds of healthy information on plants. Do not eat decorative plants. Keep poisonous plants away from small children. Your cat on the other hand can safely eat catgrass or Cyperus. You will find catgrass under the heading ‘plants’. Look for the plant with the grassy, jumbly look. Or click on this link.

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5. How large will my Take-a-way plant grow?

That depends on the species of the plant and how large they grow in the wild. Most of the plants that are sold under the Take-a-way label will not grow much larger than they were when you first saw them. Some of them will. Take good care of your house plants. Use rainwater and add some plant nutrition every once in a while. Make certain they get enough light from the sun. After a while you could replant them into a bigger pot in order to give them space to grow. This way they can flourish and become large and beautiful. When they get too big, you can cut them. You had best cut your plants in early spring. In the spring months they receive enough daylight to be able to survive through the hard times of suddenly having much less leaves.

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6. How can I prevent my plants from falling ill?

When a plant is either to dry or too wet, when it gets either too much sunlight or too little, it has stress. Just like human beings, when a plant is stressed, it is more susceptible to insects and diseases. It is important to take good care of your plants and to get informed on how to do that for a particular species. Check for special advice under the heading ‘plant care’ for all your Take-a-way plants. There are some general rules: when a plant is too dry, for example, it is easily attacked by red spider mites or greenflies. Sudden or prolonged moisture can cause the roots to rot, so that the plant is no longer able to absorb any water. There are many factors that influence your plants’ health and wellbeing. But sometimes… there is nothing you can do. Some plants at some point are done blossoming or growing, and they die. When that happens you will have to look out for some new plants.

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7. What can I do when my plant has aphids?

Aphids are tiny green or almost-black insects that drink from the plant’s juices with their special little snouts. They prefer the young sprouts for they are softer and more permeable. Aphid causes the plant to become crooked or to stop growing or blossoming. At your local garden centre or flower shop you will be able to buy some special greenfly killers. Most of them are of a biological basis. Some say that you should spray the plant with a mixture of lukewarm water, a low dose of methylated spirit and green soap. Do this in the evening, so that you avoid having the sun burn your plant. Or another old trick: stick some garlic in the soil. Greenflies do not seem to be fond of the smell of garlic. You might be able to chase them away.

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8. What can I do when my plant has red spider mite?

Red spider mites are little spiders that sit on the bottom of the leaf. When they are too many, they will migrate towards the tips. The spiders are hardly visible to the human eye. The first sign of a red spider mite invasion is when you find that while you spray your plant, little drops of water will get stuck in tiny, almost invisible webs. When the invasion gets worse, the leaves will turn greyish or yellow. Red spider mite is difficult to overcome. The only remedy is that they hate cold water! Spray your plant twice a day with cold water, and make certain the water hits the bottoms of the leaves or any other place where they might be hiding. You might be able to save your plant. If you don’t succeed, you will have to let it go and get a new one.

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9. What can I do when my plant has scale insects or mealybugs?

It is hardly possible to kill scale insects or mealybugs. As long as you keep your plants in good condition, they are not likely to develop these diseases. You can recognise scale insects by the microscopic scales at the bottoms of the leaves, close to the veins on the leaves. Underneath the little scales there are tiny little insects that drink from the plant’s juices. You will find mealybugs in exactly the same spot, but they look different. They look like little wads of white fluff, that protect the bug that is hiding underneath. Since they have such wonderful hiding methods and protection strategies, they are hard to reach with bug killer substances. You had best go to your local garden centre or flower shop and ask the experts what to do in your particular case.

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